Improved stop detection and distance calculation with a speed sensor

Marcel K shared this idea 1 week ago
Collecting votes

Hi!

First of all, Locus is amazing, keep up the great work!


I use Locus to record rides with my road bike and noticed two things:


First, it seems like the total distance of a ride is computed with the recorded gps location points, is that right? If so, I would love to see that the distance is computed from the speed sensor data (with the comulative wheel revolutions parameter and the wheel circumference). This has obvious advantages: The distance will be much more accurate, and the update frequency of the gps points could be reduced without sacrificing accuracy, while saving battery life.


Secondly, I noticed that the stop detection seems to depend on the gps location, correct? If that is the case, one might get an unreliable stop detection if the gps is inaccurate, and a lot of false positives. In my option, it would be a much better solution to use the speed sensor for the stop detection. If the wheel stops spinning, the bike is standing and the activity should be paused. Again this has advantages: It is way more precise than using gps location updates, and thus delivers a more accurate moving average speed.


Again, I really love Locus, but these two improvements would make it the perfect cycling computer for road cyclists, making the accuracy of the track recording competitive with high end dedicated cycling computers!

Comments (3)

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For the second idea: How is the accelerometer sensor is measuring speed? is it based on wind exposure? Also, there is an option in the setting to record only when moving .

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Sure I know that option, but it uses the accelerometer, so it is relatively prone to false positives, I noticed that on my rides. The accelerometer might work okay, but I think if you already own a wheel speed sensor, it is the best possible way to detect movement.

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Oh by the way, if I say speed sensor, I mean something like the wahoo wheel rpm speed sensor (https://de-eu.wahoofitness.com/devices/bike-sensors/bluetooth-speed-sensor), it's a device that you put on your front wheel axle to measure how often it turns. If you know your wheel circumference, you can use it to accurately measure your total cycled distance, and with that your accurate average speed. When only using the gps location points, the total distance tends to be too low and the average speed too high as a result.

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