Using the gravity sensor, orientation sensor or accelerometer to move the map

Igor Magellan shared this idea 1 year ago
Collecting votes

(google translate, sorry)
Hi !


In the autumn hike under rainy weather is very often troublesome devices with capacitive touch screen. (such as TFT)

Difficult to manage program, when the fingers are wet, cold or just wear gloves.

Scaling is still possible with the buttons of the volume control. ( + - ) But the shift maps is very difficult.

It would be great if Locus could use the gravity sensor to move the map in the direction of inclination of the phone body. Tipped to the left - map "went" in the direction of gravity, in the same direction. The tilt to his map down, as if "draining". It would be nice to speed and displacement maps were tuned the same.

In some cases, it strongly would simplify the viewing maps to the severe weather conditions.

Comments (18)

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I suppose it would have to be controlled by accelerometers as well. IMHO the feature should be disabled if acceleration crosses a threshold ( driving ) or if screen is off)

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in "Quick Settings" ON/OFF

and "sensitivity" somewhere, maybe

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a shake - autocenter feature...

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I support the idea of ​​using a smartphone orientation sensor to move the map on the screen

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Nice idea! Shake it to center on GPS / activate the feature and then tilt it to move the map. Would really help viewing maps in shit wheather.


Unfortunately, Locus Team only ever uses Locus in a sunny city backyard environment with perfect lte coverage... so dont get your hopes up for this one :)

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I think, that it would be a very helpfull in rainy (and something like that) weather.

Hope, that idea will not be ignored by Locus team.

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Great

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Really useful feature to have

Will be nice to have it in Locus

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I support the idea of ​​using a smartphone orientation sensor to move the map on the screen

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But this option is to be able to disable

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I like the concept but will this only work if the phone is held flat (parallel to the ground)?

What happens if I raise the phone to a vertical position (i.e. the way one normally looks at a phone)? Will the map now start to pan continuously?

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plenty of of possible variants... for example - scrolling stops when the tilt angle becomes too large.

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Your suggestion to implement a "tilt-angle limit" still adheres to the principal of holding the phone (nearly) flat for all panning operations. There's still no way to pan when the phone is held in the more natural, near-vertical orientation without first returning it to the near-horizontal orientation; it's counter-intuitive.

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Just a thought: perhaps this idea is best implemented with phone gestures? A gesture would be independent of the phone's initial orientation (i.e. the phone doesn't have to be flat).

For example, use a "snap" gesture (move phone rapidly up by about 10 cm then return to original position). This gesture produced a high "g-force" in the "up" direction (detected by the accelerometer). You can "snap" up, down, right, or left, depending on which direction you want to pan the map. The phone's initial position becomes irrelevant. You can hold the phone vertically or horizontally, snap up, and the map would pan up.

BTW, my phone has a "twist" gesture (rapidly twist your wrist) that automatically activates its camera.

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Just use a stylus!

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I would like this feature as well. It brings more comfort. With gloves it is also better.

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I am quite new here but Locus has been longer. I am also for this support.

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To all the people who voted for this Idea, I suggest you perform the following experiment to simulate this proposed "tilt to pan" feature.

First, the purpose of this new feature is to pan a map during bad weather when you are wearing thick gloves or mittens. To properly perform this simulation, hold your phone while wearing gloves (or mittens).

Second, become familiar with the terms "pitch" and "roll". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aircraft_principal_axes


  • In Locus Map, display the Compass screen.
  • The indicator on the lower left shows the "pitch" angle.
  • The indicator on the lower right shows the "roll" angle.
  • Tilt the phone and pretend you are panning a map.
  • Change the pitch to simulate panning the map up and down.
  • Change the roll to simulate panning the map left and right.
  • Look at the pitch and roll angles.
  • Determine the range of angles when the panning should begin and end.

The first thing you will notice is that holding a phone perfectly level is not a natural position, especially if you using the phone in bad weather. It is more natural to hold the phone facing you (like a book).

The second thing you will notice is that rotating your wrist for "pitch" is easier than bending it for "roll". To ensure comfort, the range for roll angles will be less than for pitch angles.

The third thing you will notice is that a large roll angle may cause the screen to rotate from portrait to landscape mode. It may be necessary to lock the screen orientation to use the "tilt to pan" feature.

Based on my tests, here are the suggested ranges for panning. These ranges allow you to comfortable hold a phone in a natural, near-vertical position. Outside of these ranges, panning stops.

Pitch Angles (for panning the map up or down)

Pan up: -30° to -45°

Pan down: 5° to 20°

Roll Angles (for panning the map left or right)

Pan right: -5° to -15°

Pan left: 5° to 15°

Try it for yourself and see what range of pitch and roll angles works best for you.