What is Track, Route?

wkdl shared this question 4 years ago
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What is Track, Route?

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Hello wkdl,


I'm not sure I get the point. Seems you know better then me difference between Track/Route from usually point of view.


http://help.locusmap.eu/topic/is-there-a-list-of-waypoints-in-a-track#comment-13469

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In GPX Schema,


wpt Type - wpt represents a waypoint, point of interest, or named feature on a map.

rte Type - rte represents route - an ordered list of waypoints representing a series of turn points leading to a destination.

trk Type - trk represents a track - an ordered list of points describing a path.


Start.


.gpx Track (trk): The connecting line between several trackpoints (trkpt). It is the past.


.gpx Waypoints (wpt) are free independent with Track or Route, they do not belong to Track or Route , they are not connected to any track or route . Free to be placed on the map anywhere, or be used as POI(WPT). Selected Waypoints and tracks can be mixed "traveled path together" into one single merged .gpx file to share, but have in fact nothing in common. They are the past.


.gpx Route: where to go to "via" routepoints (rtetp). It is the future.


So, Track is composed of trackpoints,

Route is composed of routepoints , not waypoint, simply routepoint is similar to waypoint,

Waypoints are composed of waypoints.

To be used in combination with routable maps. A mobile gps system with a routable map so auto suggests (= Navigation) a path how to drive or walk towards end, via all the routepoints.


Trying to follow existing routes if known by the used gps routable map ! So the suggested routepoints by app's or gps's depends on differences in the used routable maps.


Used with a nonroutable map (Locus native) waypoints are simply connected with (longer) straight lines. (it is not routepoint).

Here, waypoint is target-point WPT to WPT


Routepoints in Locus are indicated with downwards pointing red arrows.


Attachment File is a Route , It is composed of routepoints.

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Sometimes I get very rough track (only few trackpoints) to plan a motorcycle tour.

Ex. 20 trackpoints for a tour of 300 km.


I`d like to load this manually created track in Locus and I`d like to be able to generate a route (via CloudMade, MapQuest...) similar to the manually created track to do it via "Add new route (as a matter of fact, manually created track, it is composed of trackpoints in default)" with "Compute route" from point to point.


This route might have some hundred or thousands routepoints (the points CloudMade delivers) and is much more detailed than "Manually created track".


(I think, this function exist in Locus)

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Routes and tracks. There are a few key differences to keep in mind when using routes and tracks.


Routes are pre-defined paths where to go in the sequence you want to go to a destination.

Routes contain routepoints, not waypoints.

Routes are created on the device(Locus)


Tracks act like breadcrumb trails, allowing you to see where you traveled in the past.

Tracks contain trackpoints, not waypoints.


There are two different types of tracks:


Active Track:

  1. Contains trackpoints for your current activity
  2. Can be saved as a “Saved Track”

Saved Tracks: (be composed trackpoints)

  1. Created typically from the active track.
  2. Manually created track.
  3. Imported track.


Having a proper understanding on the key differences of routes and tracks will allow you to choose the best GPS information set for navigation.


Converting a Track to a Route


Here are the steps

  1. Select "Navigate" and create Route from Selected Track, and the conversion to a ROUTE will take place
  2. "Navigate" can convert a TRACK to a ROUTE.

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Works with routes, tracks and waypoints


  • a track is a list of trackpoints , that is the record of a driven/walked/flown trip
  • a route is a list of routepoints that, given a street map and a routing algorithm, give a tour to drive or walk; if you log the routepoints during this, you get a track
  • a waypoint list is an aggregation of waypoints, used for points of interest (POI) data collections, which may be used for waypoint navigation(Guide On, Direct to)


The generic term position list is used for tracks as well as for routes and waypoint lists.

The following examples show how RouteConverter displays the same position list as route, track and waypoints on a map:


http://www.routeconverter.de/routes-tracks-waypoints/en


Route on map

routeconverter_route_on_map


Track on map

routeconverter_track_on_map


Waypoints on map

routeconverter_waypoints_on_map

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GPS Waypoints, Routes, and Tracks – the difference


.gpx xml file anatomy


The 3 xml file examples below contain four 'positions' with longitude and latitude only. There is no elevational or time information, although in the Track, there probably would be if it had been generated on the GPS by following an actual course on the ground.


A .gpx Waypoints file

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>

<gpx xmlns="http://www.topografix.com/GPX/1/1"; version="1.1" creator="RouteConverter">

<metadata>

<name>Test file by Patrick</name>

</metadata>

<wpt lon="9.860624216140083" lat="54.9328621088893">

<ele>0.0</ele>

<name>Position 1</name>

</wpt>

<wpt lon="9.86092208681491" lat="54.93293237320851">

<ele>0.0</ele>

<name>Position 2</name>

</wpt>

<wpt lon="9.86187816543752" lat="54.93327743521187">

<ele>0.0</ele>

<name>Position 3</name>

</wpt>

<wpt lon="9.862439849679859" lat="54.93342326167919">

<ele>0.0</ele>

<name>Position 4</name>

</wpt>

</gpx>


A .gpx Route file

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>

<gpx xmlns="http://www.topografix.com/GPX/1/1"; version="1.1" creator="RouteConverter">

<metadata>

<name>Test file by Patrick</name>

</metadata>

<rte>

<name>Patrick's Route</name>

<rtept lon="9.860624216140083" lat="54.9328621088893">

<ele>0.0</ele>

<name>Position 1</name>

</rtept>

<rtept lon="9.86092208681491" lat="54.93293237320851">

<ele>0.0</ele>

<name>Position 2</name>

</rtept>

<rtept lon="9.86187816543752" lat="54.93327743521187">

<ele>0.0</ele>

<name>Position 3</name>

</rtept>

<rtept lon="9.862439849679859" lat="54.93342326167919">

<ele>0.0</ele>

<name>Position 4</name>

</rtept>

</rte>

</gpx>


A .gpx Track

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>

<gpx xmlns="http://www.topografix.com/GPX/1/1"; version="1.1" creator="RouteConverter">

<metadata>

<name>Test file by Patrick</name>

</metadata>

<trk>

<name>Patrick's Track</name>

<trkseg>

<trkpt lon="9.860624216140083" lat="54.9328621088893">

<ele>0.0</ele>

<name>Position 1</name>

</trkpt>

<trkpt lon="9.86092208681491" lat="54.93293237320851">

<ele>0.0</ele>

<name>Position 2</name>

</trkpt>

<trkpt lon="9.86187816543752" lat="54.93327743521187">

<ele>0.0</ele>

<name>Position 3</name>

</trkpt>

<trkpt lon="9.862439849679859" lat="54.93342326167919">

<ele>0.0</ele>

<name>Position 4</name>

</trkpt>

</trkseg>

</trk>

</gpx>


GPS Waypoints

14066177301_3e5e9fd58e_o

GPS Waypoints in MapSource – Waypoints flagged with position names


GPS Route

14069849664_84f27b11dc_o

A GPS Route in MapSource – Route in purple with positions flagged


GPS Track

14069377425_5a863ecbb4_o

A GPS Track in MapSource – Track in yellow with positions dotted


The essential xml syntax for GPX Waypoints, Routes, and Tracks should be self-evident from the above. In a plain text editor you can open the files, edit them, or write your own, although they are usually generated by a GPS unit, using software such as MapSource, or on a website offering online route planning and export of .gpx files to your computer or GPS. Read more on the GPX 1.1 Schema Documentation »

Posted by Patrick on February 26th, 2010.


http://cycleseven.org/gps-waypoints-routes-and-tracks-the-difference

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fetch


above is a track in Locus


below is a route in Locus


fetch


Track and Route in Locus are not same , They are different from each other


In GPX Schema,


Route is an ordered list of routepoints leading to a destination.

Track is an ordered list of trackpoints describing a path.


In GPS Unit (Locus)


Track is the connecting line of trackpoints describing a path. It is the past.

Route is the connecting line of routepoints leading to a destination. It is the future.


Navigation is run via route.

Itinerary is an ordered list of Turnpoints, that is a part of routepoint.

fetch


that is all

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Websites that make routes generate XML (a language).

A .gpx file is XML (websites are built in a language called HTML).

When you load a file into your Locus, it reads and handles it according to the type of file and how the GPS is programmed.

I use Locus a lot and I'm interested in how it works.

That's all.


I'm not interested in ball bearings so I don't take my hubs to bits.


I tend to refer to where I'm going as a course, so not to confuse the issue (because a Route and a Track are not the same).


Anyway, what I've tried to illustrate above is the makeup of Waypoints, Routes, and Tracks – in terms of their different XML structures.

There's no need to know this when using a GPS unless you're curious how it works.

But yes, a Track is made up of trackpoints (trkpt) and a Route is routepoints (rtept).

A straight path needs only 2 points.

You can see the list of points in a 'path' (i.e. Track or Route) by opening the .gpx file in Windows Notepad or the Mac equivalent text editor. .gpx files (GPS Exchange Format) are interchangeable between applications and Web services, so you can both use them on a GPS and upload them onto a mapping website.

Not that you'd want to do this, but you can theoretically write your own in a plain text editor.

You can't easily count the number of points on a long path without using something like Garmin MapSource, and that isn't yet supported for Mac.

So you'd have to use something else, like RouteConverter maybe – it's free and works well for me.

Those diagrams above illustrate how Waypoints, Routepoints, and Trackpoints behave.

Generally speaking you cannot navigate a Track on a GPS other than by simply following the line in map view.

With a Route, the GPS will navigate actively, recalculating as required. And you can tell the GPS to 'go to (direct to, or guide to)' a Waypoint.

The tracklog your GPS generates as you cycle – what you've referred to as a trace – is a Track in just the same XML format as a Track you export from BikeHike, except that it might well include elevational data in the <ele> tags (and perhaps time data).

I hope this helps.

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> You can't easily count the number of points on a long path without using something like Garmin MapSource, and that isn't yet supported forMac.


> So you'd have to use something else, like RouteConverter maybe


In Locus, call data > tracks > open one folder > open one track > switch to statistics tab - you'll see amongst other information the amount of points.


> Generally speaking you cannot navigate a Track on a GPS other than by simply following the line in map view.

> With a Route, the GPS will navigate actively, recalculating as required. And you can tell the GPS to 'go to (direct to, or guide to)' a Waypoint.


Most GPS devices and softwares I used did not make a big difference between routes and tracks. Most allow to guide along a track and a route. Many don't distinguish between track and route tags of a GPX file or allow to convert between the two. But only some allow to create a track, either manually (adding single points that will make up the track/route) or automatically (like car navigation systems).

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Hi Georg D

Thank you for your reply.


You are right, I agree with you.


Most GPS devices and softwares did not make a big difference between [gpx routes] and [gpx tracks].

Many don't distinguish between track and route tags of a GPX file.


hp_cycle_guiding


In GPX Schema,


Route file is an ordered list of routepoints leading to a destination.

Track file is an ordered list of trackpoints describing a path.


You can see the list of points in a 'path' (i.e. Track file or Route file) by opening the .gpx file.


Gpx files (GPS Exchange Format) are interchangeable between applications, so you can both use them on a GPS Unit like Locus.


My only concern is that "What is Track and Route" in Locus, not GPX file

Maybe In GPS Unit (Locus)


hp_track_recording_map

Maybe "Track" is the connected line of describing a path. It is passed Path. Red line

Maybe "Route" is the connected line of leading to a destination. It is Path to go . Pink line

hp_cycling_and_navigation

This is my key point in my Question.

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Track is the connected line of describing a path

Track does not contain "turn-by-turn" information

hp_cycle_guiding


Route contains "turn-by-turn" information. It is cuesheet information

With a Route, the GPS Unit will navigate actively, recalculating as required. And you can tell the GPS Unit to go to a Destination. It is called "Route Navigation" especially "Navigate to" in Locus

hp_cycling_and_navigation


Generally speaking you cannot navigate a Track on a GPS Unit, because of no turn-by-turn information. But as a matter of result to convert "Track information" as a "Route information" , you can navigate along the track. It is passively generated "Navigation Orders". It is called "Track Navigation" especially "Navigate" in Locus

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@wkdl: all feedback is appreciated, anyway please best short, go straight to points, do not copy other pages (just insert link to them), do no include unnecessary images etc. Otherwise I'll have to delete parts of your posts, because they are really long and I'm often not sure, what is point. Thanks for understanding.

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In GPS World like Locus

A Track is the actual path that was undertaken (actually recorded path). It is the connected line of describing a path.

A Route is a planned path for a future journey (path to go in the future). It is the connected line of leading to a destination.


In GPX World in file format

GPX Route file is an ordered list of routepoints leading to a destination.

GPX Track file is an ordered list of points describing a path.

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A Track is the actual path that was undertaken. It is a actually recorded path in the past.

A Route is a planned path for a future journey. It is a path to follow in the future.

Active track is path that you are recording.

http://docs.locusmap.eu/lib/exe/fetch.php?media=manual:track_record_02.png

Active route is path that you are following.

http://docs.locusmap.eu/lib/exe/fetch.php?media=manual:navigation_guiding:navigate_turn_by_turn_car.png